Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Depressing Tuesday

Another rainy day in Salalah. Kids happily playing in puddles, and others mourning their parents. Yes, more horrific accidents yesterday in this town. Our roads aren't ready for this kind of traffic and most so-called 'adults' out there aren't qualified enough to be sitting behind a wheel in my opinion. Omanis blame the Emiratis. Emiratis blame the Omanis. I blame everyone.  

The number of accidents in Oman this year is just horrific. From January 1st to August 24th, there were 5562 car accidents in Oman, resulting in 740 deaths. That doesn't include the dozen people (at least) who've died in Dhofar since August 24th with the insane tourist rush.

Yesterday a horrible accident near Al Mughsayl in Dhofar killed at least 9 people, 7 of whom were UAE nationals. From the photos, it appears that four vehicles were involved in the collision, a UAE car, an Omani car, and 2 trucks. How fast were these people going? Who was the one irresponsible idiot who caused it? (some say it was the truck drivers, others say it was the UAE driver - in either case the person who caused the death of all those people is either dead himself or will suffer the rest of his life from guilt I hope)

How many dead bodies do you need to see before you realize just how irresponsible and dangerous your driving is?

You being a good driver means NOTHING. It doesn't justify speeding, driving while talking on the phone, not wearing a seatbelt, zooming in and out of lanes without indicating. One TINY mistake and your life (along with the lives of others) is gone. Does life mean nothing to you?

"Inshallah everything will be fine" is complete BS. God is not going to help you if you dont' help yourself. Why should God care about you if you are unable to care about the wellbeing of your fellow humans? Every single time I leave my house, I prepare to die. I drive on the right lane and never go above 80 or 90 Km/per hour. I am constantly checking my mirrors and mentally bracing myself for a collision. Is the driver of that little silver Camry going to be my murderer? What about the young guy in the brand new Toyota Land Cruiser who is tailgating that poor old Indian man? Look! There's an ARMY officer in uniform driving without a seatbelt and holding two phones, each in one hand while trying to manage the wheel with one palm. Surely he's going to kill someone today.

Am I paranoid? No. I've just seen enough dead bodies to remind me that my life is in danger the minute I get on any road here in Oman. Shameful but true. If you are one of those animals who doesn't give a damn about the lives of others on the road, F*** you and your attitude. You are worthless.

Pissed off Gucci.

83 comments:

  1. I was just tweeting about accidents in Oman. Not sure what could be done with people's mentalities

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  2. that really is depressing :(

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  3. I have seen enough dead people as well. Something has to change :(

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  4. Traffic offences should lead to prison-time.

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  5. At least two little children were killed in the accident at Mughsayl. Young lives lost because of stupidity. الله فوق

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    1. Seven now, according to the Gulf News

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  6. Police report says that the Emirati was overtaking. Just saying.

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  7. في رأيي -وحسب ما علمت- فإنه ليس من العدالة اسناد المسؤولية عن الحادث الى سائق الشاحنة لوحده، حيث ان أحد السائقين الآخرين على الأقل مشترك في الخطأ.
    ولكن نظرا لوفاتهما فإن العاطفة تغلب تصوير سائق الشاحنة (لأنه أجنبي، ويقود شاحنة، وبقي حيا) على انه هو المسؤول عن الحادث.
    عموما القيادة في صلالة خلال هذه الفترة هي من عبارة عن "دفاع عن النفس" !

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  8. I'm from the Uk and I lived in Oman for over a year. I did a lot of driving all over the country and although there are a lot of irresponsible and dangerously nervous drivers on the roads the worst driving I saw, without exception, was from driving school cars without any passengers - presumably the instructors. If the instructors are that bad what hope does anyone else have?

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  9. I heard the truck driver caused it. In all cases, I shall pray for the families of those who died and those who are injured. And I will pray for the souls of all the IDIOTS out there who will have a lot to explain on Judgement Day.

    F.

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    1. We should also pray that our leaders here see the light and take action at last

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  10. I agree with UK Anonymous - driving instructors and taxi drivers are the worst.

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  11. I have seen six dead people in car accidents over the past two years. Is it my bad luck or a horrible increase in the number of road deaths? Just terrible.

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  12. "F*** you and your attitude. You are worthless". Wow, Gucci. You really are in a bad mood. In many ways, I don't blame you at all. Al Hamdulillah until now I have not seen any dead bodies. I am also a very careful driver.

    Fatma

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    1. Well, Miss Smug, presuming you are a driver from round here, that puts you in a minority of one. So just why do you feel Dhofari Gucci should not feel rage (a 'bad mood' is patronising her, as I'm sure you realise) at the needless carnage in this country? Do you not think it high time for Oman to seriously deal with the daily murder on the roads here?

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    2. 58 dead in 10 days - and rising

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  13. Thank you for your honesty and your anger. So many of us identify with how you feel. I just got back in from abroad and am gobsmacked at how the driving here compares to even the very worst of driving abroad. (With the exception of other Gulf countries.) I had already got to the stage where I am frightened to drive my children even to the shops. I feel and act exactly like you do very time I take the car out - which we all must. What is going on in the minds of these arrogant murderers? Many of them don't even possess licences, for all that that is worth. Can it be a deliberate policy to let the populace maim and anihilate itself? What more can it take before something changes?

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  14. It was clearly the fault of the emirati driving an overloaded cruiser filled with kids, who pulled out into the main road without bothering to judge the speed and distance of the truck. How many times I have seen people do this, it's ridiculous.

    pls refer to the gulf news article. I can't paste link for some reason.

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  15. So I guess the response will be another 'road-show' or 'road-safety work-shop'. Very effective those, I tell you!1!!1

    I just got into work, and on the way, an Omani girl, driving a grey Suzuki4WD, on the left lane (fast lane) at Muttrah Corniche. There's a pedestrian crossing in front of Bait Baranda or the Fish R/A as it's called.
    A courteous driver gave hazards and was allowing peds to cross, and our miss Suzuki couldnt wait to get to her job, so she decides to:

    swerve to the right lane, without indicators, over-takes the stopped vehicle from the right, almost running over the 3 or so pedestrians crossing, and then proceeds to get angry at the pedestrians.

    This driving problem is something else in Oman. It's unique, that even when you're in the wrong, you can get all ragy, and act as if you're a God-send.

    It's said on many occassions, Omanis are THE most courteous folks in the Gulf, but as soon as they get behind the wheel, they are possessed by the devil or Jinn himself.

    There is no other explanation.

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    1. A common sight and one we are increasingly forced to accept. No prospect of Naming and Shaming as a deterrent - clearly THERE IS NO SHAME. As you say, more like a god given sense of self entitlement

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  16. The Juweira Hotel sent out an email to travel companies on 26th July saying were are full over Eid. The Hilton send one out on 30th July and on 1st August with a follow up on the 6th the Marriott send out a similar one. So one can say that by 1st August probably all hotels that take bookings were full for Eid.
    Every time I drive down to Salalah on the Nizwa / Thumrait road I see horrific crashes - two that stand out
    a car was wedged underneath a petrol tanker - all people in the car probably de-capitated

    a Land Cruiser with its contents all over the desert on the road-side. Remarkably no body seemed seriously injured as one of the guys was smoking sheesha!(I kid you not) presumably waiting for friends or tow-truck.

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  17. ...and annoying are those confident drivers who think that nothing can ever happen to them. "I speed, but with caution".. F**k your caution!
    There's no way you can control your car at 120+ speed.
    Even if you maintain a safe distance from the car ahead of you, there are a zillion other ways some obstacle may come in front of you and then how will you control your car?! Putting yourself and others to die!

    PS - I'm also one of those driving within the speed limit on the right lane, looking out for the monsters who might be the cause of my death

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  18. ..... WHY DON'T THE POLICE DO ANYTHING ABOUT THE CRAZY DRIVERS?

    They never seem to take action even if they see a dangerous situation: babies on the front seat, guys on top of a roof, people speeding or worse- driving too slow...

    I just don't get it!

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    1. "Drivers driving too slow"...........somewhere in that post is so much irony.

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  19. Dear Oman,

    Time for public transport.

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  20. I feel exactly as you do. Terror and incredulity. Every single time I have to go out in my car

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  21. But who will drive the buses? The same people who drive the school buses now and nonchalantly put every child at risk?

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  22. They only leap into action when a foreigner has their sidelights on by mistake, don't you know?

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  23. I completely agree... when oh when are they going to implement a proper (and by that I mean robust, non-wasta-affected, rigorous) driving test - akin to that of the UK perhaps?
    First of all however, one must teach the driving instructors and authorities to drive.
    Get the DVLA (UK driving authorities) here for a year or two and the driving in this country would be reformed.

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    1. There was a time when most of the (few) drivers in Oman were PDO - read British - trained. They drove pretty well in those days, apart from the odd unlicenced taxi driver

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  24. The only way you will change things is by creating conequences for people. The ROP send out text messages asking people to drive safely - as if! Why are they not pulling people over and fining them? The fines need to be significant enough to hurt people financially and there needs to be a system whereby eventually you lose your licence. In the UK you get 'points' on your licence. If you reach 12 points your license is gone! Also, having points on your license makes your insurance payments go through the roof. People need to be punished. Enough is enough! The tailgating that goes on here at 120+ kph is terrifying. It happens to me eveytime I go out. Someone will drive inches off my bumper flashing their lights, despite the fact there is clearly traffic in front of me. Where exactly do you want me to go?! Into the car in front? The sense of urgency people demonstrate in their cars is particularly laughable given that there is no urgency given to anything else in this society! The increase in traffic is irrelevant. Yes, it's frustrating, but it should have no baring on people being killed - only that people actually should need to drive slower and take longer to get anywhere! Oman has a tiny population (2.5 - 3 million?) - how can there possibly be so many road deaths?? The UK has 60+ million people and much smaller, narrower roads, and our road death toll for 2010 was 1850. There is something very, very wrong in Oman. Does it make me angry?! Hell yeah! I take it very personally that people endanger my life needlessly everyday. If they want to kill themselves, fine - but they have no right to kill others! People do the most ridiculous things here. On the Salalah - Muscat road I lost track of how many people were driving with full sun-shields across their windscreens. What the hell can they see?? ROP needs to step up and do something. And we need to see an end to the wasta that means anyone with the right connections will just get their fines revoked. Reckless and dangerous driving needs to be properly punished, people need to wear seatbelts and talking on phones etc needs to be banned (and that ban enforced). Simple!

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    1. All Omanis have the 'right connections'. That's why the police are terrified to take any real action - except towards foreigners. That's why school teachers are terrified of their pupils, too. That's why even their own parents are terrified of the new breed of Omani - and the driving is a reflection of just that attitude

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    2. and therein lies the problem! If there are no consequences then people have no incentive to change. Do we not speed in the UK because we're all wonderful, law abiding citizens? No, we dont speed because we know we'll end up with a huge fine and points on our licence! (regardless of who we know!)

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    3. I don't entirely agree with this. In Britain, people also refrain from the kind of driving we see here because they have a highly developed sense of consequence, aside from in the punitive sense. Most British drivers make it a priority not to kill and maim themselves and others on the road - let alone their own families, captive at their mercy in the vehicle. They do not by and large consider dangerous driving to be an amusing pastime. This with the exception of the drunk or the young and foolish, who exist everywhere. This is true of many other places, and is also lacking in many places, but I'm just saying as I think you are doing us Brits a slight injustice here!

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  25. Oh and anon is so right. ROP are too busy stopping Westerners who accidentally leave their lights on (coz yeah, that's SO dangerous!)

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  26. Omani Driving, just one example:

    Very near the spot where this accident occurred in Mughsail - two Dhofari boys (I should say men - they were actually about 24) in a lethal heap of metal crossed onto my side of the road and drove straight at me at very high speed. There were crash barriers on each side so I could not swerve away. I had three children in the car - one little boy in the front seat. I tried to protect him and waited to die. At the absolute last moment they swerved back onto their own side of the road, laughing and jeering. I now know this is a common experience and it has happened again since. Along with countless other terrifying scares, day in, day out for all the years I've lived in Oman.

    Emirati driving:
    Ever been deliberately forced off the road by each and every member of a every huge convoy of top-of-the-range cruisers travelling at 200kph? You obviously have never driven from Salalah to Dubai in the Khareef. They can't do it at home any more - because they are kept under control

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    1. That post gave me chills....Glad yous are safe.

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    2. Those convoys get their kicks from bullying weaker vehicles and terrorizing the roads of a country they view as inferior. If a few people get killed in the process, who's even taking note?

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    3. More omani boy men playing Chicken

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    4. Driving in virtual reality the blood is not real

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    5. That seriously brought me to tears bc ive seen it way too many times and im left frightend that my son will die here due to others stupidity

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  27. You are right. There is something very, very wrong in Oman for this to be regarded as the norm

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  28. JJ is so right. Unfortunately, Oman has a longggggggg way to go with the traffic accident / stupid drivers situation.

    A few years back, my kid had his end of year school program at Bustan palace where they had a program on road safety. There were short movie clips of kids riding in the front seat without seatbelts and it showed what could happen. I gasped in horror and the majority of the (Omani) audience busted out laughing. The mentality is simply whacked along with the lack of any sort of system for traffic offenses. I betcha when they start raising insurance premiums and raising the speeding fines (and stick to them), it would have an impact.

    Last thing - premiums for new drivers should be higher as well. We're paying $1400 US dollars every six months for our son in the states to drive a used car. He has no traffic offense records, but due to his age and the fact that he's a male, he's considered high risk - and that's with a $500 US dollar deductible if he were in accident and he was at fault!!!

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  29. Shiver, shiver ... I am a Westerner and I'll be driving on Omani roads soon. What is that thing about Westerners leaving the lights on accidentally? Where I live the lights have to be on day and night.

    Kate

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    1. Exactly, but it is the only thing which raises any eyebrows here. Oh, and foreigners taking off their seatbelts to reverse park (standard procedure elsewhere) has resulted in fines and time in a cell. Same if you were foolish enough to have bought a car already with a few centimetres of shaded glass - even completely outside the line of vision. Anything to give the impression the police are actually doing something. Meanwhile Omanis frequently drive in complete illegal blackout - especially in Salalah where they say it is to hide the women from view! - and all those babies sitting on dashboards, on the driver's lap, and hanging out of the windows sure are NOT wearing seatbelts. If you haven't been before, prepare to take your life in your hands

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    2. so, you been stopped by rop for a. Having ur headlights on during the day b. Taking off ur seatbelt to reverse and c. Having light tint on ur windows?
      I call utter bs, andy.

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    3. I know several foreigners (Western) who've been stopped for having their lights on. Most have talked their way out of a fine - but the ROP did at least initially want to issue one. I therefore find it entirely plausible that what Anon says is true!

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    4. That is not what the post says. Just your own wild mis-interpretation. You cannot know Oman well if you are questioning such occurences. They are commonplace. The ROP can and do haul foreigners, and Omanis too, in on all kinds of minor infringements. The point being made is that they overlook the life-threatening abuses because Oman's own system makes them powerless. But why so aggressive? Not enough sleep? Who are you to accuse posters online of false claims? Read again - your accusations have no basis and the claims you are calling were not there in the first place.

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    5. Clearly you do not live in Salalah. Here the police - so often from the North - are completely neutered. The ONLY offences they can act upon are the minor ones and the only drivers they dare to stop are foreign ones. All the instances mentioned have happened and are just the tip of the iceberg. Presumably don't know, either, that down here the foreigner always takes the rap - insurance and otherwise - for any accident. Totally regardless of whether the Dhofari is (as is usually the case) at fault. Meanwhile, playing chicken on the roads, racing round the city's highways at top speed or trying to push women drivers into a ditch is a normal pastime, which young men round here pursue with total impunity. Ask anyone who lives here. Ask any car rental agency. Ask any off duty policeman. Ask any of those boys of summer. Ask Dhofari Gucci - she knows. Better you live the life or get yourself informed before engaging in ill guarded slurs.

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    6. Many thanks to JJ and anons for defending my integrity! I and myriad others have been stopped for the lights business. An Australian doctor in Salalah was fined for that particular seatbelt incident. A colleague of mine was pulled in and fined for the lightest strip of green tint on the top of the windscreen of a Jeep he had just bought. Why stop there? What about another colleague whom narrowly escaped death at the hands of an elderly Jebali with cataracts (I jest not) driving at about 160 kph on a small Salalah road? His car hire company ended up footing the whole bill and then some (the whole tribe descended like carrion) despite him being totally innocent and wronged. The list is neverending. I am not going to write any more as I'm not up for being maligned by strangers online. Sissy's attack was unpleasant - and not in the spirit of free discussion. So to say, as free as we can manage in the circumstances

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  30. https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/216841_265036326946244_165419679_n.jpg

    that's an illustration of the accident. you tell me who was at fault

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    1. The sense of the standards of Oman, and the assured feeling they'll just abuse the truck driver if he honks and brakes hard.

      Your call.

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    2. I knew it! I don't understand why these god damn idiots think they can just pull into traffic without even taking a second to judge oncoming traffic. the driver should be charged with manslaughter if he's not already rotting in the ground. Too bad he took so many innocents with him.

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    3. If that illustration is correct then it's pretty damn obvious what happened. A car pulled out without looking or caring that there was oncoming traffic (a daily occurrence here). People keep making reference to the truck travelling at 'high speed' but lets face it - if there's a truck coming towards you you don't pull out in front of it do you?! Most traffic here moves pretty fast. I hope they dont lay the blame with the truck driver simply because he's not Arab (I'm sorry to say this kind of racism and lack of value placed on Asian lives is a common occurrence here).

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    4. Everyone now knows what happened. The Emirati tragically killed nearly his whole family, innocent Omanis including a small boy, and himself. His wife lies at death's door.. The Emirati press et al are trying to frame up the truck driver - because that's the way it always works round here. As if the man didn't have enough to contend with, with his legs mangled in hospital and all that horror to haunt him all his life. Let's hope, pray if you will, that the Omani authorities have more respect for the facts. But it won't bring any of those little children back, will it?

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  31. This accident was reported as having taken place at the Mughsail turnoff. In which case, the unfortunate 'victim' must have 'misjudged the speed' of the truck when pulling out. As Mr Mapengo says, this happens all the time on Oman's roads - whoever is behind the wheel, it is the norm. Word to the wise - there would be no time for anybody to pull out if a truck was heading towards them at that particular junction. However, they are implicating the Pakistani truck driver by saying he was going too fast down the steep mountain road from Dalkut and was unable to stop himself ploughing into the family's cruiser. The red car driver was obviously not expecting anyone to pull out either, or his son would still be alive today. Curiously, though, the photo above does NOT SHOW the accident occurring at this spot. Dhofari Gucci's photos, and many in press, show the spot to be actually on the clear road leading towards Raysut, quite a long way from the Mughsail turn-off. NOWHERE NEAR THE SEA OR THE MOUNTAIN. Ask any Dhofari. Is it any wonder the dangerous driving issue is never dealt with, when the facts are so obscured? Even/especially in the media. Could they possibly have mis-reported the location to frame up the Pakistani? Why else? This is in an Emirati newspaper and the family killed were Emiratis. The Omani driver was a genuine victim, in this case.

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    1. There is no real investigation into accidents here - no forensic style reports. It doesn't take a scientist to work out what happened in a lot of cases and, even still, the wrong person is often accused. I know of people who were charged with causing an accident when they weren't even at the scene (they went past after the accident had already happened) - but someone supposedly saw their vehicle in the vicinity and suddenly they were to blame. I guess there's more money to be had from a Westerner. It's despicable though. How can anyone have any faith in a system that will simply punish whoever suits them whilst ignoring the facts staring them in the face?!

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  32. Hi everyone - I'm really pleased with all the comments here. Please keep sharing your thoughts and ideas. something has to be done about the current situation and it seems most of you (and me) are blaming the ROP for not taking enough action.

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    1. The ROP also need to properly trained though and need to set a good example. Some of the worst culprits on the roads are the ROP themselves. Furthermore, their powers are completely undermined so long as we have a system whereby the powerful people will just make a phonecall and have their crime revoked. How can we expect police to work effectively in such an environment? What respect can the police invoke when they essentially know they are powerless. If someone in the UK were to drive like some of the people here they would be charged with reckless driving and endangerment and they would lose their licence and possibly even serve prison time. A genuine accident is one thing, but the driving here is akin to murder. You really know that you're likely to kill someone when driving as they do here...

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    2. Absolutely. Even since this thread started, there have been numerous more deaths that would be deemed manslaughter elsewhere. Just tonight I saw four accidents in as many hours in a fairly quiet of area of Muscat - thankfully non-fatal but, needless to say, totally avoidable.

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    3. Well, that is just one part of what has been said. Mentality has been alluded to a lot, as have underlying causes. People do seem to be preaching to the converted here and - partly because it is in English - only a couple of Omanis seem to have commented. To those 'converted' who are forced to put their lives at risk by venturing out on Oman's roads, it is beyond belief that Omanis themselves seem content to accept what's going on. The strongest reaction the topic of road safety ever seems to merit is a few giggles. The main concern about the Salalah-Muscat road remains one of who drove it the fastest, never the most safely! Of course something has to be done, but only Omanis can do it! Words are not enough, especially on an anonymous blog, so what about meaningful action? Even if it is only for you to put all this strength of feeling in front of someone very powerful who has the will and vision to turn back this wave of killing and bloodshed

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    4. Anon - I totally agree about us preaching to the converted on here and needing to take meaningful action. What do you suggest?? Gucci - can you do something/start something? You would certainly have my support and I'm sure many others on here - but I do think any campaign needs to be instigated by an Omani (and in Arabic) to be taken seriously!

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    5. JJ says it all. Just like the British cannot only blame their sordid press for the trash the populace likes to read, so Oman cannot get away with blaming the ROP for what the will of the populace demands from them. The whole mindset needs an overhaul

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    6. JJ - I would suggest exactly what you have suggested and agree there would be a lot of support. Part of the problem has been acknowledging that the problem exists, so that's at least a start. Unfortunately, I don't feel that non-nationals have much of a chance of being heard. What does Gucci have to say on the meaningful action front? Because, in the end, words are just a starting point. It's been excellent to have a forum for comparing perceptions but, sadly, this could not contribute tosaving even one of the lives lost since this discussion began. It has also had zilch impact on the quality of driving out there! (Only tonight I nearly met my end at the hands of a lone and manic female driving instructor!) On reflection, the root of the problem lies bound up in issues of identity. It can be seen as a response to pressure, frustration and fear - and of far too much change far too fast. On another level, the absence of training and technical competence are blindingly in evidence. A terrifying majority of drivers here hardly seem to know how to control their own vehicles. Or to be aware of anything happening outside their own car - or own self. Personally, I'm not sure the measures suggested by yourself and other will suffice to change all that. Of course they should happen as a matter of urgency - but there's no escaping we seem to be up against a death wish here. Meanwhile, we are all in the dark as to the perception at the top. Who knows, maybe there is some overdue strategy finally about to be unveiled. It would have to be a drastic one. Failing that...?

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  33. Hi-teck speed cameras, red light systems to monitor traffic soon. For more read today's Muscat Daily-page 3.

    The ROP is doing ALL it can.

    Mti

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    1. Mti,

      technology is NOT the only answer.

      Technology will help to an extent, but when there is no meaningful action at the end of it, technology just remains a waste of money.

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  34. Andy Sissy? Captain Mohammed of the ROP, more likely. Or Sergeant Abdullah, I presume? Whichever, some apologist for what goes on in the name of good policing. And a misguided one at that.

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    1. hah! Got ur panties in a bunch andy? I am a foreigner, happen to drive with my heads on during the daytime because any extra visibility helps when it comes to driving on these roads, and have darker than legal tint on the sides and back. Passed dozens of rop patrols without issue, and if I were to get pulled over, I'd be able handle it better than you sissies. Don't hate the player

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    2. Bright yellow Hummer? Or is it black? Drive like you talk? Guaranteed the police will avoid your sort every bit as much as the wasta wielders. I know I would

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  35. Ladies and gents, just a suggestion.

    I've done it myself 6 months ago, and would recommend it to everyone - invest in a good:

    DASHBOARD CAMERA

    Believe me, it's simple to find on the net (e-bay) preferably the swivel one, it can record back and front or even sideways activity. My car was smashed from the back, and I got footage of it, which helped solve the matter in minutes.

    Just drop me a mail:

    alwaysfound247@gmail.com in case you want to know the dealer from e-bay who can ship this to you.

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  36. Judging by his attitude, the ROP would be too intimidated to pull 'Andy is a Sissy' over either! He doesn't come over like one of those meek drivers cowering in the slow lane - who do fit the bill.

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  37. Mti - High-tech cameras and traffic lights wont stop people tailgating at ludicrous speeds, pulling out without looking, trying to go all the way round a roundabout in the wrong lane (preventing people in the correct lane from turning off without a collision), nor the people who overtake dangerously or try to force you off the road. These matters need to be dealt with by polic patrols who pull the offenders over and ensure they are punished. Reckless driving to the endangerment of life would be an approproate charge!

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  38. In some countries in Europe, police on patrol - hidden, on motorbikes, on foot, in squad cars, with and without the help of cameras and radar - just leap out on offenders. They wield great Darth Vadar style light batons and fine, punishingly, right on the spot. It has proven extremely effective

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  39. they should'nt be able to get a licence till they are 21. Then only aloud to drive 1300cc cars. Plus use the points system to ban these mindless morons

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  40. Driving in Oman has become a real problem and dangrous when it used to be a pleasure to drive in Oman. Of course bad driving habits, greedy taxi drivers, etc. Are all to blame but in my opinion the first party to blame is the Royal Omani Police! Why you ask? They give the license in the first place and their testing system is antiquated and redundant. They should set the standards for driving schools and have strict rules on safe driving and point deduction instead of writing slogans and they should fight corruption inside the force including selling licences!

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  41. I disagree with the comment that people shouldn't drive till their 21 or drive low power cars. If they're actually taught and tested properly and there are proper rules & regulations then there's no reason why people cant drive at a younger age (17/18). There is good reason to have powerful 4x4s here where a lot of driving is off-road. Also, many families only own such cars, so do you expect them to buy an additional smaller vehicle for their children? The problem is not with youth but in the shodding driving lessons/tests/policing/rules/enforcement/punishment. The crazy actions I see on the road are as much and more from older people.

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  42. Like all those life and death dicing paterfamilias at the wheels of monster trucks - over stuffed with wives and children, all at his mercy. This was exactly the case at the Mughsail accident. No, it's certainly not only the young...

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  43. "the most courteous folks in the Gulf"

    Talk about damning with faint praise!

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  44. Less than a generation ago Omani people ranked among the most courteous in the WORLD. It ain't just the driving that's gone so badly wrong

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  45. In the late 90s they had a very good system of radar/video cameras here which was strongly implemented. This is also used to great effect now, in the UAE - and we all now how ferociously THEY choose to drive when given free rein on their holidays to Oman. Why have these controls disappeared in Oman? Speeding is only one aspect of the problem, but it would at least be a basic first step to enforce the law in this area

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  46. When all is said and done, most trucks are driven far too fast and recklessly. Just like all the other vehicles but far more lethal by weight. Why oh why not just slow down and be vigillant?

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  47. this post has definatly got me upset to remember all that ive seen here in the past 4 yrs i myself am from USA and seeing how ppl drive here is the most insane thing ive seen my whole life. and not to mention the fact that they DO NOT have a carseat law for children really upsets me to watch all these children riding around hanging out windows and sunroofs in drivers laps and in front seats and no one seems to care... and not to mention the omani's IMPATIENCE on the road is beyond anything ill ever understand WHATS THE RUSH PPL SERIOUSLY are you in an emergency and need a hosptial? NO SO SLOW THE F DOWN before you end up in a hospital with ppl who youve MURDERED! it really upsets me all the time when i get in a car here. im constantly affraid i will loose my son who's only 2 yrs old due to ppls STUPIDITY. TRUCKS SPEED - YES ... land cruisers act like they're the ruler of the roads and bully ppl all the time- YES.... over taking when your on a curve going up a hill/mountain or down one where u cannot see on coming traffic - YES YES YES..... over taking and nearly hitting on coming cars - ya Allah YESSSSS.... can ROP doing anything .. NO unfortunately i feel that these ppl here in oman especially dhofar will NEVER follow the law no matter the consequences no respect for lives after all they are illiterate and ignorant most of the time. UAE visiters are guilty alot of the times - YESSSSSS!!! as well as indian/paki/egyptian SO ON SO ON its not omanis or this that EVERYONE drives stupid over here.... but who is the most stupid of them all... jabeli's/dhofari's and UAE drivers ESPECIALLY THE YOUNG BOYS who dont seem sometimes to b old enough to drive let alone see over the steering wheel! LMBO .... i could go on and on about this subject but for any foreigners planning to come to salalah or oman make sure you bring a carseat for your child and strap them in at all times and everytime you go in ur car make sure your prepared for ANYTHING and EVERYTHING to potentinally happen

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